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Microsoft joins Google to delete revenge porn from search results

Microsoft is joining Google in accepting requests from revenge porn victims to remove links from search results for explicit content posted without permission.  In a blog post Wednesday, Microsoft said would also remove access to the content itself when the revenge porn is shared on Microsoft’s OneDrive or Xbox Live.

Microsoft has set up a reporting web page so victims identify particular photos and videos. The page is currently available in English and will be expanded to other languages “in the coming weeks.” Microsoft says that it will remove links or content globally.

In early July, Google posted a web form to take requests from people who have had nude or sexually explicit images  posted on the web without a person’s consents.  Google will remove the submitted links from Google Search results. Google says that it is a narrow and limited policy, similar to how its treats removal requests for other highly sensitive personal information, such as bank account numbers and signatures.

Revenge porn is also getting the attention of the FBI, the FTC and the California Attorney General.  In April, the California AG announced the sentencing of Kevin Bollaert, operator of a cyber-exploitation website which posted nude photos of individuals with personal identifying information without their consent.

In February, an FBI investigation into email hacking led to a guilty plea in Federal court  by Hunter Moore, the so-called “king of revenge porn” who faces two years in prison and a $500,000 fine.

In January, the FTC brought its first action, shutting down Craig Brittain for publicly sharing nude videos and photo without consent and then extorting money from victims to take down the postings.